Intel, AMD and Apple make 2020 the big year of CPU

Soon, 2020 will end. It takes eternal experience to get here, or is a year gone by? We have commissioned a series of year-end stories that involve changes in the technology sector in the past 12 months, we are on the brink of the processor revolution, how Twitch maintains its streaming crown, and our favorite story 2020 games and gadgets.

Tomorrow is January 1, 2021. We will switch the holiday from a seasonal holiday to CES preparation to deal with the Las Vegas show that is only performed online.

The “Upgraded Edition” program at the end of the year focused on AMD and Intel’s recent processor efforts, and high-end chips such as Zen 3 and “Comet Lake” compete with each other. At the same time, Apple introduced its first PC processor M1. Next year maybe more interesting-challenging for Intel.

Last year, Apple sued the security startup Corellium, accusing its “virtual” iPhone of violating copyright laws, which can help researchers find bugs in iOS products. Now, a federal judge in Florida has dropped Apple’s copyright complaint, which has given Corellium a major victory in its legal battle against the technology giant.

Even if there is no physical iPhone with special software installed, the software can provide security experts with deeper access to iOS. Apple said that Corellium sold its products indiscriminately, thereby compromising the security of the platform.

The South Korean company is setting up some physical demonstrations for its online CES 2021 showroom. The most interesting one is the restaurant scene (so far), where the sushi bar has a 55-inch transparent OLED screen.

Diners can browse the menu or watch the video on the big screen, and thanks to the 40% transparency, they can also watch the chef cook behind this futuristic sanitary partition. In contrast, according to LG Display, transparent LCDs can only provide 10% transparency.

US attorney Seth DuCharme said in a press release: “Ticketing officer employees repeatedly (illegally) illegally use competitors’ passwords to access competitors’ computers and use stolen passwords to illegally collect business intelligence.

“In order to avoid prosecuting the matter, Ticketmaster will pay a fine of 10 million US dollars after the settlement with 110 million US dollars earlier.

According to court documents and previous reports, Stephen Mead left Ticketmaster’s competitor Songkick in 2012 after signing a non-disclosure agreement, and subsequently joined Ticketmaster’s parent, Live Nation.

Allegedly, he subsequently shared Songkick’s login information with Ticketmaster employees, including Zeeshan Zaidi, the former head of artist services at Ticketmaster.

“Accomplice No. 1” (also known as Mead) told executives “Grasp the hell from the system” and boldly pointed out: “I must emphasize that since this is a real-time tool, I will ask you to Choose what you click carefully, and it’s best not to reveal what we’re looking at.”

NASA will participate in two missions that may provide us with the data needed to better understand solar wind and explosions or the entire space weather.

The agency has officially announced its participation in the Epsilon Mission (EUVST) and Electrojet Zeeman Imaging Explorer (EZIE) projects.

EUVST is a solar telescope project that will study more closely how the solar atmosphere releases solar wind and ejects solar materials, thereby affecting the level of radiation in space.

At the same time, EZIE involves three small satellites that will monitor the auroral jets or currents that connect the aurora to the poles of the Earth’s magnetosphere.

Scientists hope to study electric jets, because the same phenomenon that causes aurora may also interfere with radio and communication signals and damage the flight of spacecraft in orbit.

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